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June is a humble gentleman and prolific writer absence of ego .His poems speak with the wisdom and knowledge of a griot .Which causes the reader to stop - reflect humble up with gratitude .Inspiring humanity !http://www.innerchildpress.com/june-barefield.php

 

4 the Dawn

June Barefield

Poetry

Socio ~ Political

 

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I Want My Poetry To... the new book inspired by Monte Smith's poem " Rebel Poetry " (Innerchild Press) 

 

 I Want My Poetry To... (Preface)

First and foremost this book was born out of a great understanding felt by many, but not vocalized enough: It’s okay to be a poet.

When I came up with the idea to share a poem and have other poets contribute to it by way of posting on Facebook, I never thought it would garner such attention. The idea behind this book came on March 4th of this year, when I shared a poem titled “Rebel Poetry” during a radio interview with Jill Dellbridge on The Artist Lounge (hosted on Talk Shoe). I knew prior to the interview that Ms. Dellbridge would ask me to recite one or two poems. So earlier in the day as I was looking for pieces to read, it hit me that I should try and connect with the audience in a much more personal way.

A great artist is one who constantly tries to keep their performance fresh. I realized not long ago that throughout my career I have followed the same template when it comes to doing radio interviews: introduce myself, answer twenty to forty minutes of questions, then end by reading a couple of poems. I feel I have always excited the listening audience but constantly felt as soon as the interview was over the poems and energy were forgotten. I wanted this time to be different. 

I say this because every time I sit down to write a new poem, I can’t help but think of all the great poets who will never have their work read or heard due to the business that surrounds poetry and publishing. As far as human conditioning goes, nothing positive can be said for how we treat each other’s dreams and ambitions. Take the phrase, "It’s not what you know, but who you know.” This razor sharp saying has become a popular rule of broken thumb. Web sites will tell you it’s mostly used in business and government. The origin is unclear but due to human ego it has sadly withstood the test of time, proof that we have failed the test.

Some may point out that those starving in the killing fields of poetry, music, and art best realize this. I have to agree. To an artist it is the ultimate break it or make it reality. Shame on us. How can we continue to call ourselves civilized or approach the arts with integrity when it’s blatantly known it’s not about the talent you possess, but how many favors are given or owed? And most importantly, how many connects/friends will vouch for your on-line stats at the deal table.

This is why so many poets awake hung over, pissed off and miserable. Not because they want to, but because they have no say in the day that lies ahead. Point being, you shouldn’t feel like you're dying every time you arrive at your place of employment. But I do. I’m not exaggerating either. I literally feel poisoned to the extreme of blacking out. It’s gotten to the point where I don’t know if I’m punching the clock, or if it’s punching me.

I know a lot of you are thinking, “You fucking ingrate. There are orphans in Malawi selling grilled mice on skewers to motorists. You should be content you even have a job.” Exactly. And like the kids in Malawi, I believe eighty-five percent of the population are misplaced, subjecting themselves to the wrong route, task or trade, and hating their fucking existence every day, as I do mine.

Don’t kid yourself; this is what happens when you can’t be what you are. Repeat that if you have to. Now imagine how productive we as a planet could be if everyone believed they had a place--that they did count. Not as a barcode, but as a needed contributor to the human collective with your talent being your worth. That alone would motivate people to levels of humanity unseen by our divided lie-balls.

I’m a poet, not a plumber. I need to work with words, not septic tanks. Ask yourself: would you want your garbage man pulling your wisdom teeth? I want my creativity back. If I feel the urge to write at four thirty in the morning, I should be able to. But it’s impossible when the alarm clock is holding you at knife point, it’s beady red eyes reminding you every second that your time is not your own. I don’t know about you, but when I hear the sound of an out of control alarm clock at six in the morning, I want to shoot my self. Why? Because I know it’s the sound of defeat.

This is why my poem for The Artist Lounge had to be different. I wanted my poem to let people know my story is theirs, and not to give up on their dreams and ambitions no matter how hard it becomes. To know there are others with the same fire who are not scared of saying what needs to be said. But at the same time, I wanted my piece to ask the hard questions: What is your poetry saying? What impact is it having on you and the community?

Then it clicked--start a poem and let the listening audience finish it. But keep the theme “I want my poetry to…” as the running thread to weave all the contributors words into one long poetic call for solidarity. I want everyone who contributed to realize that we, along with Inner Child Press are creating “our story” not his-tory… salute!

Now, what do you want your poetry to say?

Street Poet Monte Smith

Babylon

3/13/12

Please visit http://www.innerchildpress.com/amazon-discount.php and order your copy today!

Thank you to Monte Smith , Inner Child Press, each and everyone who made this possible.I received my copies of "i want my Poetry to" this week and wept joyful tears.... a humbling honor to be apart of this book. A beautiful composition /collaboration of amazing poets from around the globe. Inspiring and motivating .I am looking forward to many more collaborations in the near future .So fret not if you are reading this and were not apart of part duex 2 coming soon....Thank You to purchase go here  http://www.innerchildpress.com/amazon-discount.php 

 

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 "Don't Shoot The Hostages" by Monte Smith

 Review by :Martina Reisz Newberry 
 To purchase Monte's book go here : 
 
Review of Don’t shoot the hostages. Better yet, don’t shoot anybody.
Martina Reisz Newberry, Palm Springs, 2012

It would be a terrible shame if Monte Smith’s fine writing were to be lost or ignored in the piles of mediocre poetry, which proliferate the literary scene all over this country today. He is angry, disappointed, crushed, hungry, exhausted and in love all at the same time and his poems will involve you, the reader, in all of it. If this work doesn’t step on your feet and holler at you to pay attention, give it up because nothing else ever will.

His “Dedication” alone, at the beginning of the book is worth the price of this volume of clear thinking poetry and prose.

He dedicates this book in part to the:
…wrongly convicted,
mentally disturbed,
clinically depressed,
pissed off,
pissed on,
hopeless,
lifeless,
voiceless..

Chances are, you’ve been one of these or one of the other listed in the dedication. If you aren’t one of them yet, you will be. And, when you are, you’ll turn to this book to find yourself.

Free of conventional rhyme—sometimes free of conventional reason—these poems waste no time in making a space in your heart and a hole in your psyche in which to live. They will move the rainbows and butterflies around to make room for real self-examination, the need for compassion, a force-feeding of “take-a-look-around-and-DO-something.” You will feel yourself grabbed and shaken by the coldness the planet calls “charity.” You will find yourself afraid of what “poverty” really means and afraid to find out that you, along with a plethora of your brothers and sister on earth, are really a victim. 

Is this poetry, you ask? This thorn in your paw, this damned mosquito bite on your bum, this bitten lip and squinted eye—is this poetry? Oh God yes it is! Smith tells us—and rightly so (in “By The Way”):

How can we as performing poets change
For the better with all this talking?
Easy
It’s time to remember the youth and stop
Beating the listener’s ears up with half-assed
Attempts to define your ego in public
The word is not to be fucked with
The power of language suffers when writers
Come unequipped to be fighters…

After the first two poems in this book, I was hooked. Monte Smith joins the strong voices of Amiri Baraka, Terrence Hayes, Tom Terrell, James Baldwin, Langston Hughes and others whom I know are proud to have him in their midst. I have cried, cursed, and put down this book several times only to pick it up again and continue reading and (God help me!) THINKING.

This is not a book to digest with a cup of tea and warm fire in the fireplace. When you read these poems, be ready for the fire to be burning in your belly and singeing your eyelashes. These are poems of strength and a relentless curiosity as to the “why” of hate and racism, violence and terror. Read “102.Gendercide FM” to feel what a real condemnation of the suppression and violence against women is. Smith asks:

How can we stop it?

Like man do the earth
Man do the girl
I ask you…

And later,

How are we going to
Save our daughters?

Monte Smith broke my heart, put it back together, bent my mind, straightened it out a little with a hot iron, and, in the end, made me wish I’d written these poems. Look and listen for more from this young voice. He tells us:

I duct-taped a brick to my pen before I wrote I this
Matter of fact I do it nightly
For the high and mighty
Lyrically lost in their own wonderland…

Indeed he did exactly that. That brick sits on my desk, a reminder of what strength in words really means. Buy this book. Buy one for yourself and buy a few to hand out to a literary community and a planet often blinded by a witless desire to stay blind and deaf.
Thank you, Monte Smith.
Martina Reisz Newberry, Palm Springs, 2012

It would be a terrible shame if Monte Smith’s fine writing were to be lost or ignored in the piles of mediocre poetry, which proliferate the literary scene all over this country today. He is angry, disappointed, crushed, hungry, exhausted and in love all at the same time and his poems will involve you, the reader, in all of it. If this work doesn’t step on your feet and holler at you to pay attention, give it up because nothing else ever will.

His “Dedication” alone, at the beginning of the book is worth the price of this volume of clear thinking poetry and prose.

He dedicates this book in part to the:
…wrongly convicted,
mentally disturbed,
clinically depressed,
pissed off,
pissed on,
hopeless,
lifeless,
voiceless..

Chances are, you’ve been one of these or one of the other listed in the dedication. If you aren’t one of them yet, you will be. And, when you are, you’ll turn to this book to find yourself.

Free of conventional rhyme—sometimes free of conventional reason—these poems waste no time in making a space in your heart and a hole in your psyche in which to live. They will move the rainbows and butterflies around to make room for real self-examination, the need for compassion, a force-feeding of “take-a-look-around-and-DO-something.” You will feel yourself grabbed and shaken by the coldness the planet calls “charity.” You will find yourself afraid of what “poverty” really means and afraid to find out that you, along with a plethora of your brothers and sister on earth, are really a victim. 

Is this poetry, you ask? This thorn in your paw, this damned mosquito bite on your bum, this bitten lip and squinted eye—is this poetry? Oh God yes it is! Smith tells us—and rightly so (in “By The Way”):

How can we as performing poets change
For the better with all this talking?
Easy
It’s time to remember the youth and stop
Beating the listener’s ears up with half-assed
Attempts to define your ego in public
The word is not to be fucked with
The power of language suffers when writers
Come unequipped to be fighters…

After the first two poems in this book, I was hooked. Monte Smith joins the strong voices of Amiri Baraka, Terrence Hayes, Tom Terrell, James Baldwin, Langston Hughes and others whom I know are proud to have him in their midst. I have cried, cursed, and put down this book several times only to pick it up again and continue reading and (God help me!) THINKING.

This is not a book to digest with a cup of tea and warm fire in the fireplace. When you read these poems, be ready for the fire to be burning in your belly and singeing your eyelashes. These are poems of strength and a relentless curiosity as to the “why” of hate and racism, violence and terror. Read “102.Gendercide FM” to feel what a real condemnation of the suppression and violence against women is. Smith asks:

How can we stop it?

Like man do the earth
Man do the girl
I ask you…

And later,

How are we going to
Save our daughters?

Monte Smith broke my heart, put it back together, bent my mind, straightened it out a little with a hot iron, and, in the end, made me wish I’d written these poems. Look and listen for more from this young voice. He tells us:

I duct-taped a brick to my pen before I wrote I this
Matter of fact I do it nightly
For the high and mighty
Lyrically lost in their own wonderland…

Indeed he did exactly that. That brick sits on my desk, a reminder of what strength in words really means. Buy this book. Buy one for yourself and buy a few to hand out to a literary community and a planet often blinded by a witless desire to stay blind and deaf.
Thank you, Monte Smith.
 Review of Don’t shoot the hostages. Better yet, don’t shoot anybody.
Martina Reisz Newberry, Palm Springs, 2012

It would be a terrible shame if Monte Smith’s fine writing were to be lost or ignored in the piles of mediocre poetry, which proliferate the literary scene all over this country today. He is angry, disappointed, crushed, hungry, exhausted and in love all at the same time and his poems will involve you, the reader, in all of it. If this work doesn’t step on your feet and holler at you to pay attention, give it up because nothing else ever will.

His “Dedication” alone, at the beginning of the book is worth the price of this volume of clear thinking poetry and prose.

He dedicates this book in part to the:
…wrongly convicted,
mentally disturbed,
clinically depressed,
pissed off,
pissed on,
hopeless,
lifeless,
voiceless..

Chances are, you’ve been one of these or one of the other listed in the dedication. If you aren’t one of them yet, you will be. And, when you are, you’ll turn to this book to find yourself.

Free of conventional rhyme—sometimes free of conventional reason—these poems waste no time in making a space in your heart and a hole in your psyche in which to live. They will move the rainbows and butterflies around to make room for real self-examination, the need for compassion, a force-feeding of “take-a-look-around-and-DO-something.” You will feel yourself grabbed and shaken by the coldness the planet calls “charity.” You will find yourself afraid of what “poverty” really means and afraid to find out that you, along with a plethora of your brothers and sister on earth, are really a victim. 

Is this poetry, you ask? This thorn in your paw, this damned mosquito bite on your bum, this bitten lip and squinted eye—is this poetry? Oh God yes it is! Smith tells us—and rightly so (in “By The Way”):

How can we as performing poets change
For the better with all this talking?
Easy
It’s time to remember the youth and stop
Beating the listener’s ears up with half-assed
Attempts to define your ego in public
The word is not to be fucked with
The power of language suffers when writers
Come unequipped to be fighters…

After the first two poems in this book, I was hooked. Monte Smith joins the strong voices of Amiri Baraka, Terrence Hayes, Tom Terrell, James Baldwin, Langston Hughes and others whom I know are proud to have him in their midst. I have cried, cursed, and put down this book several times only to pick it up again and continue reading and (God help me!) THINKING.

This is not a book to digest with a cup of tea and warm fire in the fireplace. When you read these poems, be ready for the fire to be burning in your belly and singeing your eyelashes. These are poems of strength and a relentless curiosity as to the “why” of hate and racism, violence and terror. Read “102.Gendercide FM” to feel what a real condemnation of the suppression and violence against women is. Smith asks:

How can we stop it?

Like man do the earth
Man do the girl
I ask you…

And later,

How are we going to
Save our daughters?

Monte Smith broke my heart, put it back together, bent my mind, straightened it out a little with a hot iron, and, in the end, made me wish I’d written these poems. Look and listen for more from this young voice. He tells us:

I duct-taped a brick to my pen before I wrote I this
Matter of fact I do it nightly
For the high and mighty
Lyrically lost in their own wonderland…

Indeed he did exactly that. That brick sits on my desk, a reminder of what strength in words really means. Buy this book. Buy one for yourself and buy a few to hand out to a literary community and a planet often blinded by a witless desire to stay blind and deaf.
Thank you, Monte Smith.
 
Martina Reisz Newberry, Palm Springs, 2012

It would be a terrible shame if Monte Smith’s fine writing were to be lost or ignored in the piles of mediocre poetry, which proliferate the literary scene all over this country today. He is angry, disappointed, crushed, hungry, exhausted and in love all at the same time and his poems will involve you, the reader, in all of it. If this work doesn’t step on your feet and holler at you to pay attention, give it up because nothing else ever will.

His “Dedication” alone, at the beginning of the book is worth the price of this volume of clear thinking poetry and prose.

He dedicates this book in part to the:
…wrongly convicted,
mentally disturbed,
clinically depressed,
pissed off,
pissed on,
hopeless,
lifeless,
voiceless..

Chances are, you’ve been one of these or one of the other listed in the dedication. If you aren’t one of them yet, you will be. And, when you are, you’ll turn to this book to find yourself.

Free of conventional rhyme—sometimes free of conventional reason—these poems waste no time in making a space in your heart and a hole in your psyche in which to live. They will move the rainbows and butterflies around to make room for real self-examination, the need for compassion, a force-feeding of “take-a-look-around-and-DO-something.” You will feel yourself grabbed and shaken by the coldness the planet calls “charity.” You will find yourself afraid of what “poverty” really means and afraid to find out that you, along with a plethora of your brothers and sister on earth, are really a victim. 

Is this poetry, you ask? This thorn in your paw, this damned mosquito bite on your bum, this bitten lip and squinted eye—is this poetry? Oh God yes it is! Smith tells us—and rightly so (in “By The Way”):

How can we as performing poets change
For the better with all this talking?
Easy
It’s time to remember the youth and stop
Beating the listener’s ears up with half-assed
Attempts to define your ego in public
The word is not to be fucked with
The power of language suffers when writers
Come unequipped to be fighters…

After the first two poems in this book, I was hooked. Monte Smith joins the strong voices of Amiri Baraka, Terrence Hayes, Tom Terrell, James Baldwin, Langston Hughes and others whom I know are proud to have him in their midst. I have cried, cursed, and put down this book several times only to pick it up again and continue reading and (God help me!) THINKING.

This is not a book to digest with a cup of tea and warm fire in the fireplace. When you read these poems, be ready for the fire to be burning in your belly and singeing your eyelashes. These are poems of strength and a relentless curiosity as to the “why” of hate and racism, violence and terror. Read “102.Gendercide FM” to feel what a real condemnation of the suppression and violence against women is. Smith asks:

How can we stop it?

Like man do the earth
Man do the girl
I ask you…

And later,

How are we going to
Save our daughters?

Monte Smith broke my heart, put it back together, bent my mind, straightened it out a little with a hot iron, and, in the end, made me wish I’d written these poems. Look and listen for more from this young voice. He tells us:

I duct-taped a brick to my pen before I wrote I this
Matter of fact I do it nightly
For the high and mighty
Lyrically lost in their own wonderland…

Indeed he did exactly that. That brick sits on my desk, a reminder of what strength in words really means. Buy this book. Buy one for yourself and buy a few to hand out to a literary community and a planet often blinded by a witless desire to stay blind and deaf.
Thank you, Monte Smith.
Martina Reisz Newberry, Palm Springs, 2012

It would be a terrible shame if Monte Smith’s fine writing were to be lost or ignored in the piles of mediocre poetry, which proliferate the literary scene all over this country today. He is angry, disappointed, crushed, hungry, exhausted and in love all at the same time and his poems will involve you, the reader, in all of it. If this work doesn’t step on your feet and holler at you to pay attention, give it up because nothing else ever will.

His “Dedication” alone, at the beginning of the book is worth the price of this volume of clear thinking poetry and prose.

He dedicates this book in part to the:
…wrongly convicted,
mentally disturbed,
clinically depressed,
pissed off,
pissed on,
hopeless,
lifeless,
voiceless..

Chances are, you’ve been one of these or one of the other listed in the dedication. If you aren’t one of them yet, you will be. And, when you are, you’ll turn to this book to find yourself.

Free of conventional rhyme—sometimes free of conventional reason—these poems waste no time in making a space in your heart and a hole in your psyche in which to live. They will move the rainbows and butterflies around to make room for real self-examination, the need for compassion, a force-feeding of “take-a-look-around-and-DO-something.” You will feel yourself grabbed and shaken by the coldness the planet calls “charity.” You will find yourself afraid of what “poverty” really means and afraid to find out that you, along with a plethora of your brothers and sister on earth, are really a victim. 

Is this poetry, you ask? This thorn in your paw, this damned mosquito bite on your bum, this bitten lip and squinted eye—is this poetry? Oh God yes it is! Smith tells us—and rightly so (in “By The Way”):

How can we as performing poets change
For the better with all this talking?
Easy
It’s time to remember the youth and stop
Beating the listener’s ears up with half-assed
Attempts to define your ego in public
The word is not to be fucked with
The power of language suffers when writers
Come unequipped to be fighters…

After the first two poems in this book, I was hooked. Monte Smith joins the strong voices of Amiri Baraka, Terrence Hayes, Tom Terrell, James Baldwin, Langston Hughes and others whom I know are proud to have him in their midst. I have cried, cursed, and put down this book several times only to pick it up again and continue reading and (God help me!) THINKING.

This is not a book to digest with a cup of tea and warm fire in the fireplace. When you read these poems, be ready for the fire to be burning in your belly and singeing your eyelashes. These are poems of strength and a relentless curiosity as to the “why” of hate and racism, violence and terror. Read “102.Gendercide FM” to feel what a real condemnation of the suppression and violence against women is. Smith asks:

How can we stop it?

Like man do the earth
Man do the girl
I ask you…

And later,

How are we going to
Save our daughters?

Monte Smith broke my heart, put it back together, bent my mind, straightened it out a little with a hot iron, and, in the end, made me wish I’d written these poems. Look and listen for more from this young voice. He tells us:

I duct-taped a brick to my pen before I wrote I this
Matter of fact I do it nightly
For the high and mighty
Lyrically lost in their own wonderland…

Indeed he did exactly that. That brick sits on my desk, a reminder of what strength in words really means. Buy this book. Buy one for yourself and buy a few to hand out to a literary community and a planet often blinded by a witless desire to stay blind and deaf.
Thank you, Monte SmithMartina Reisz Newberry, Palm Springs, 2012

It would be a terrible shame if Monte Smith’s fine writing were to be lost or ignored in the piles of mediocre poetry, which proliferate the literary scene all over this country today. He is angry, disappointed, crushed, hungry, exhausted and in love all at the same time and his poems will involve you, the reader, in all of it. If this work doesn’t step on your feet and holler at you to pay attention, give it up because nothing else ever will.

His “Dedication” alone, at the beginning of the book is worth the price of this volume of clear thinking poetry and prose.

He dedicates this book in part to the:
…wrongly convicted,
mentally disturbed,
clinically depressed,
pissed off,
pissed on,
hopeless,
lifeless,
voiceless..

Chances are, you’ve been one of these or one of the other listed in the dedication. If you aren’t one of them yet, you will be. And, when you are, you’ll turn to this book to find yourself.

Free of conventional rhyme—sometimes free of conventional reason—these poems waste no time in making a space in your heart and a hole in your psyche in which to live. They will move the rainbows and butterflies around to make room for real self-examination, the need for compassion, a force-feeding of “take-a-look-around-and-DO-something.” You will feel yourself grabbed and shaken by the coldness the planet calls “charity.” You will find yourself afraid of what “poverty” really means and afraid to find out that you, along with a plethora of your brothers and sister on earth, are really a victim. 

Is this poetry, you ask? This thorn in your paw, this damned mosquito bite on your bum, this bitten lip and squinted eye—is this poetry? Oh God yes it is! Smith tells us—and rightly so (in “By The Way”):

How can we as performing poets change
For the better with all this talking?
Easy
It’s time to remember the youth and stop
Beating the listener’s ears up with half-assed
Attempts to define your ego in public
The word is not to be fucked with
The power of language suffers when writers
Come unequipped to be fighters…

After the first two poems in this book, I was hooked. Monte Smith joins the strong voices of Amiri Baraka, Terrence Hayes, Tom Terrell, James Baldwin, Langston Hughes and others whom I know are proud to have him in their midst. I have cried, cursed, and put down this book several times only to pick it up again and continue reading and (God help me!) THINKING.

This is not a book to digest with a cup of tea and warm fire in the fireplace. When you read these poems, be ready for the fire to be burning in your belly and singeing your eyelashes. These are poems of strength and a relentless curiosity as to the “why” of hate and racism, violence and terror. Read “102.Gendercide FM” to feel what a real condemnation of the suppression and violence against women is. Smith asks:

How can we stop it?

Like man do the earth
Man do the girl
I ask you…

And later,

How are we going to
Save our daughters?

Monte Smith broke my heart, put it back together, bent my mind, straightened it out a little with a hot iron, and, in the end, made me wish I’d written these poems. Look and listen for more from this young voice. He tells us:

I duct-taped a brick to my pen before I wrote I this
Matter of fact I do it nightly
For the high and mighty
Lyrically lost in their own wonderland…

Indeed he did exactly that. That brick sits on my desk, a reminder of what strength in words really means. Buy this book. Buy one for yourself and buy a few to hand out to a literary community and a planet often blinded by a witless desire to stay blind and deaf.
Thank you, Monte Smith.
 Martina Reisz Newberry, Palm Springs, 2012
 
 It would be a terrible shame if Monte Smith’s fine writing were to be lost or ignored in the piles of mediocre poetry,which proliferate the literary scene all over this country today. He is angry, disappointed, crushed, hungry, exhausted and in love all at the same time and his poems will involve you, the reader, in all of it. If this work doesn’t step on your feet and holler at you to pay attention, give it up because nothing else ever will.
 
 His “Dedication” alone, at the beginning of the book is worth the price of this volume of clear thinking poetry and prose.
He dedicates this book in part to the:
 
 …wrongly convicted,
 mentally disturbed,
 clinically depressed,
pissed off,
pissed on,
hopeless,
lifeless,

voiceless..

 

clinically depressed,
pissed off,
pissed on,
hopeless,
lifeless,
voiceless.
mentally disturbed,
clinically depressed,
pissed off,
pissed on,
hopeless,
lifeless,
voiceless..mentally disturbed,
clinically depressed,
pissed off,
pissed on,
hopeless,
lifeless,
voiceless.
…wrongly convicted,
mentally disturbed,
clinically depressed,
pissed off,
pissed on,
hopeless,
lifeless,
voiceless..
 pissed off,
 pissed on,
 hopeless,
 lifeless,
 voiceless..
 

lifeless,
voiceless..
Chances are, you’ve been one of these or one of the other listed in the dedication. If you aren’t one of them yet, you will be. And, when you are, you’ll turn to this book to find yourself.
 
 

lifeless,
voiceless..
Free of conventional rhyme—sometimes free of conventional reason—these poems waste no time in making a space in your heart and a hole in your psyche in which to live. They will move the rainbows and butterflies around to make room for real self-examination, the need for compassion, a force-feeding of “take-a-look-
 around-and-DO-something.” You will feel yourself grabbed and shaken by the coldness the planet calls “charity.” You will find yourself afraid of what “poverty” really means and afraid to find out that you, along with a plethora of your brothers and sister on earth, are really a victim.
 
 
lifeless,
voiceless..
hopeless,
lifeless,
voiceless..
pissed on,
hopeless,
lifeless,
voiceless..

lifeless,
voiceless..
Is this poetry, you ask? This thorn in your paw, this damned mosquito bite on your bum, this bitten lip and squinted eye—is this poetry? Oh God yes it is! Smith tells us—and rightly so (in “By The Way”):
 
 

He dedicates this book in part to the:
…wrongly convicted,
mentally disturbed,
clinically depressed,
pissed off,
pissed on,
hopeless,
lifeless,
voiceless..
 How can we as performing poets change For the better with all this talking?
 Easy
 
 It’s time to remember the youth and stopBeating the listener’s ears up with half-assed
 Attempts to define your ego in public
The word is not to be fucked with
The power of language suffers when writers
Come unequipped to be fighters…
 

Attempts to define your ego in public

Attempts to define your ego in public
Attempts to define your ego in public
The word is not to be fucked with
The power of language suffers when writers
Come unequipped to be fighters…
Beating the listener’s ears up with half-assed
Attempts to define your ego in public
The word is not to be fucked with
The power of language suffers when writers
Come unequipped to be fighters…
Easy
For the better with all this talking?
Easy
 After the first two poems in this book, I was hooked. Monte Smith joins the strong voices of Amiri Baraka, Terrence Hayes, Tom Terrell, James Baldwin, Langston Hughes and others whom I know are proud to have him in their midst. I have cried, cursed, and put down this book several times only to pick it up again and continue reading and (God help me!) THINKING.
 
 This is not a book to digest with a cup of tea and warm fire in the fireplace. When you read these poems, be ready for the fire to be burning in your belly and singeing your eyelashes. These are poems of strength and a relentless curiosity as to the “why” of hate and racism, violence and terror. Read “102.Gendercide FM” to feel what a real condemnation of the suppression and violence against women is. Smith asks:
 
 How can we stop it?
 
 
 Like man do the earth
 Man do the girl
 I ask you…
 
 And later,
 
 
I ask you…
Man do the girl
I ask you…Man do the girl
I ask you…
again and continue reading and (God help me!) THINKING.
I have cried, cursed, and put down this book several times only to pick it up 
again and continue reading and (God help me!) THINKING.
and others whom I know are proud to have him in their midst. 
I have cried, cursed, and put down this book several times only to pick it up 
again and continue reading and (God help me!) THINKING.
Terrence Hayes, Tom Terrell, James Baldwin, Langston Hughes 
and others whom I know are proud to have him in their midst. 
I have cried, cursed, and put down this book several times only to pick it up 
again and continue reading and (God help me!) THINKING.
 How are we going to
 Save our daughters?
 
 Monte Smith broke my heart, put it back together, bent my mind, straightened it out a little with a hot iron, and, in the end, made me wish I’d written these poems. Look and listen for more from this young voice. He tells us:
 
 I duct-taped a brick to my pen before I wrote I this
 Matter of fact I do it nightly
 For the high and mighty
 Lyrically lost in their own wonderland…
 
 Indeed he did exactly that. That brick sits on my desk, a reminder of what strength in words really means. Buy this book. Buy one for yourself and buy a few to hand out to a literary community and a planet often blinded by a witless desire to stay blind and deaf.
 
Thank you, Monte Smith.

 
 
Thank you, Monte Smith.
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For the high and mighty
 


For the high and mighty


For the high and mighty
 


For the high and mighty
For the high and mighty
Lyrically lost in their own wonderland…

"the Wind... the Mountain ... and the Sage ... by William S. Peters Sr. aka just Bill
thoroughly enjoyed
this beautiful book 
with my afternoon tea .
Poems are akin to the wind spontaneous ,refreshing , warm and stirring....Eloquent wordage strong and grounded hence the mountain .Free flowing.... wisdom and knowledge of the sage. You'll be taken on an ethereal , sublime , and spiritual journey.... .Each poem is accompanied by a breathtaking capture of nature .An enlightening and inspiring experience for the reader .I highly recommend you purchase a copy . You will most certainly Enjoy! 
 
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Being apart of World Healing...World Peace 2012 has been a soul fulfilling experience . Humanitarian poetic pioneers from all over the world. Coming together for a cause that affects us all and our future . Giving of themselves selfishly and collaboratively .As well as the judges, sponsors, promoters, editors ,and Inner Child Press who made it all possible.Has been a most humbling , honorable , beautiful , and gratifying experience  .A way for poets to be published who may not otherwise could  not possibly be , as well as the three celebrants.Each and every poet that contributed their touching hope filled words will be forever bound together ,in these two gorgeous volumes .That can be passed down for generations as remembrance and reminder of their ancestors collaborative literary efforts toward world healing.... world peace. Thank you with gratitude! Surely you will want these collectors volumes as part of your literary collection to purchase go here: http://www.innerchildpress.com/amazon-discount.php
 
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Review of Don’t shoot the hostages. Better yet, don’t shoot anybody.
Martina Reisz Newberry, Palm Springs, 2012

It would be a terrible shame if Monte Smith’s fine writing were to be lost or ignored in the piles of mediocre poetry, which proliferate the literary scene all over this country today. He is angry, disappointed, crushed, hungry, exhausted and in love all at the same time and his poems will involve you, the reader, in all of it. If this work doesn’t step on your feet and holler at you to pay attention, give it up because nothing else ever will.

His “Dedication” alone, at the beginning of the book is worth the price of this volume of clear thinking poetry and prose.

He dedicates this book in part to the:
…wrongly convicted,
mentally disturbed,
clinically depressed,
pissed off,
pissed on,
hopeless,
lifeless,
voiceless..

Chances are, you’ve been one of these or one of the other listed in the dedication. If you aren’t one of them yet, you will be. And, when you are, you’ll turn to this book to find yourself.

Free of conventional rhyme—sometimes free of conventional reason—these poems waste no time in making a space in your heart and a hole in your psyche in which to live. They will move the rainbows and butterflies around to make room for real self-examination, the need for compassion, a force-feeding of “take-a-look-around-and-DO-something.” You will feel yourself grabbed and shaken by the coldness the planet calls “charity.” You will find yourself afraid of what “poverty” really means and afraid to find out that you, along with a plethora of your brothers and sister on earth, are really a victim. 

Is this poetry, you ask? This thorn in your paw, this damned mosquito bite on your bum, this bitten lip and squinted eye—is this poetry? Oh God yes it is! Smith tells us—and rightly so (in “By The Way”):

How can we as performing poets change
For the better with all this talking?
Easy
It’s time to remember the youth and stop
Beating the listener’s ears up with half-assed
Attempts to define your ego in public
The word is not to be fucked with
The power of language suffers when writers
Come unequipped to be fighters…

After the first two poems in this book, I was hooked. Monte Smith joins the strong voices of Amiri Baraka, Terrence Hayes, Tom Terrell, James Baldwin, Langston Hughes and others whom I know are proud to have him in their midst. I have cried, cursed, and put down this book several times only to pick it up again and continue reading and (God help me!) THINKING.

This is not a book to digest with a cup of tea and warm fire in the fireplace. When you read these poems, be ready for the fire to be burning in your belly and singeing your eyelashes. These are poems of strength and a relentless curiosity as to the “why” of hate and racism, violence and terror. Read “102.Gendercide FM” to feel what a real condemnation of the suppression and violence against women is. Smith asks:

How can we stop it?

Like man do the earth
Man do the girl
I ask you…

And later,

How are we going to
Save our daughters?

Monte Smith broke my heart, put it back together, bent my mind, straightened it out a little with a hot iron, and, in the end, made me wish I’d written these poems. Look and listen for more from this young voice. He tells us:

I duct-taped a brick to my pen before I wrote I this
Matter of fact I do it nightly
For the high and mighty
Lyrically lost in their own wonderland…

Indeed he did exactly that. That brick sits on my desk, a reminder of what strength in words really means. Buy this book. Buy one for yourself and buy a few to hand out to a literary community and a planet often blinded by a witless desire to stay blind and deaf.
Thank you, Monte Smith.
Martina Reisz Newberry, Palm Springs, 2012

It would be a terrible shame if Monte Smith’s fine writing were to be lost or ignored in the piles of mediocre poetry, which proliferate the literary scene all over this country today. He is angry, disappointed, crushed, hungry, exhausted and in love all at the same time and his poems will involve you, the reader, in all of it. If this work doesn’t step on your feet and holler at you to pay attention, give it up because nothing else ever will.

His “Dedication” alone, at the beginning of the book is worth the price of this volume of clear thinking poetry and prose.

He dedicates this book in part to the:
…wrongly convicted,
mentally disturbed,
clinically depressed,
pissed off,
pissed on,
hopeless,
lifeless,
voiceless..

Chances are, you’ve been one of these or one of the other listed in the dedication. If you aren’t one of them yet, you will be. And, when you are, you’ll turn to this book to find yourself.

Free of conventional rhyme—sometimes free of conventional reason—these poems waste no time in making a space in your heart and a hole in your psyche in which to live. They will move the rainbows and butterflies around to make room for real self-examination, the need for compassion, a force-feeding of “take-a-look-around-and-DO-something.” You will feel yourself grabbed and shaken by the coldness the planet calls “charity.” You will find yourself afraid of what “poverty” really means and afraid to find out that you, along with a plethora of your brothers and sister on earth, are really a victim. 

Is this poetry, you ask? This thorn in your paw, this damned mosquito bite on your bum, this bitten lip and squinted eye—is this poetry? Oh God yes it is! Smith tells us—and rightly so (in “By The Way”):

How can we as performing poets change
For the better with all this talking?
Easy
It’s time to remember the youth and stop
Beating the listener’s ears up with half-assed
Attempts to define your ego in public
The word is not to be fucked with
The power of language suffers when writers
Come unequipped to be fighters…

After the first two poems in this book, I was hooked. Monte Smith joins the strong voices of Amiri Baraka, Terrence Hayes, Tom Terrell, James Baldwin, Langston Hughes and others whom I know are proud to have him in their midst. I have cried, cursed, and put down this book several times only to pick it up again and continue reading and (God help me!) THINKING.

This is not a book to digest with a cup of tea and warm fire in the fireplace. When you read these poems, be ready for the fire to be burning in your belly and singeing your eyelashes. These are poems of strength and a relentless curiosity as to the “why” of hate and racism, violence and terror. Read “102.Gendercide FM” to feel what a real condemnation of the suppression and violence against women is. Smith asks:

How can we stop it?

Like man do the earth
Man do the girl
I ask you…

And later,

How are we going to
Save our daughters?

Monte Smith broke my heart, put it back together, bent my mind, straightened it out a little with a hot iron, and, in the end, made me wish I’d written these poems. Look and listen for more from this young voice. He tells us:

I duct-taped a brick to my pen before I wrote I this
Matter of fact I do it nightly
For the high and mighty
Lyrically lost in their own wonderland…

Indeed he did exactly that. That brick sits on my desk, a reminder of what strength in words really means. Buy this book. Buy one for yourself and buy a few to hand out to a literary community and a planet often blinded by a witless desire to stay blind and deaf.
Thank you, Monte Smith.
Review of Don’t shoot the hostages. Better yet, don’t shoot anybody.
Martina Reisz Newberry, Palm Springs, 2012

It would be a terrible shame if Monte Smith’s fine writing were to be lost or ignored in the piles of mediocre poetry, which proliferate the literary scene all over this country today. He is angry, disappointed, crushed, hungry, exhausted and in love all at the same time and his poems will involve you, the reader, in all of it. If this work doesn’t step on your feet and holler at you to pay attention, give it up because nothing else ever will.

His “Dedication” alone, at the beginning of the book is worth the price of this volume of clear thinking poetry and prose.

He dedicates this book in part to the:
…wrongly convicted,
mentally disturbed,
clinically depressed,
pissed off,
pissed on,
hopeless,
lifeless,
voiceless..

Chances are, you’ve been one of these or one of the other listed in the dedication. If you aren’t one of them yet, you will be. And, when you are, you’ll turn to this book to find yourself.

Free of conventional rhyme—sometimes free of conventional reason—these poems waste no time in making a space in your heart and a hole in your psyche in which to live. They will move the rainbows and butterflies around to make room for real self-examination, the need for compassion, a force-feeding of “take-a-look-around-and-DO-something.” You will feel yourself grabbed and shaken by the coldness the planet calls “charity.” You will find yourself afraid of what “poverty” really means and afraid to find out that you, along with a plethora of your brothers and sister on earth, are really a victim. 

Is this poetry, you ask? This thorn in your paw, this damned mosquito bite on your bum, this bitten lip and squinted eye—is this poetry? Oh God yes it is! Smith tells us—and rightly so (in “By The Way”):

How can we as performing poets change
For the better with all this talking?
Easy
It’s time to remember the youth and stop
Beating the listener’s ears up with half-assed
Attempts to define your ego in public
The word is not to be fucked with
The power of language suffers when writers
Come unequipped to be fighters…

After the first two poems in this book, I was hooked. Monte Smith joins the strong voices of Amiri Baraka, Terrence Hayes, Tom Terrell, James Baldwin, Langston Hughes and others whom I know are proud to have him in their midst. I have cried, cursed, and put down this book several times only to pick it up again and continue reading and (God help me!) THINKING.

This is not a book to digest with a cup of tea and warm fire in the fireplace. When you read these poems, be ready for the fire to be burning in your belly and singeing your eyelashes. These are poems of strength and a relentless curiosity as to the “why” of hate and racism, violence and terror. Read “102.Gendercide FM” to feel what a real condemnation of the suppression and violence against women is. Smith asks:

How can we stop it?

Like man do the earth
Man do the girl
I ask you…

And later,

How are we going to
Save our daughters?

Monte Smith broke my heart, put it back together, bent my mind, straightened it out a little with a hot iron, and, in the end, made me wish I’d written these poems. Look and listen for more from this young voice. He tells us:

I duct-taped a brick to my pen before I wrote I this
Matter of fact I do it nightly
For the high and mighty
Lyrically lost in their own wonderland…

Indeed he did exactly that. That brick sits on my desk, a reminder of what strength in words really means. Buy this book. Buy one for yourself and buy a few to hand out to a literary community and a planet often blinded by a witless desire to stay blind and deaf.
Thank you, Monte Smith.
Review of Don’t shoot the hostages. Better yet, don’t shoot anybody.
Martina Reisz Newberry, Palm Springs, 2012

It would be a terrible shame if Monte Smith’s fine writing were to be lost or ignored in the piles of mediocre poetry, which proliferate the literary scene all over this country today. He is angry, disappointed, crushed, hungry, exhausted and in love all at the same time and his poems will involve you, the reader, in all of it. If this work doesn’t step on your feet and holler at you to pay attention, give it up because nothing else ever will.

His “Dedication” alone, at the beginning of the book is worth the price of this volume of clear thinking poetry and prose.

He dedicates this book in part to the:
…wrongly convicted,
mentally disturbed,
clinically depressed,
pissed off,
pissed on,
hopeless,
lifeless,
voiceless..

Chances are, you’ve been one of these or one of the other listed in the dedication. If you aren’t one of them yet, you will be. And, when you are, you’ll turn to this book to find yourself.

Free of conventional rhyme—sometimes free of conventional reason—these poems waste no time in making a space in your heart and a hole in your psyche in which to live. They will move the rainbows and butterflies around to make room for real self-examination, the need for compassion, a force-feeding of “take-a-look-around-and-DO-something.” You will feel yourself grabbed and shaken by the coldness the planet calls “charity.” You will find yourself afraid of what “poverty” really means and afraid to find out that you, along with a plethora of your brothers and sister on earth, are really a victim. 

Is this poetry, you ask? This thorn in your paw, this damned mosquito bite on your bum, this bitten lip and squinted eye—is this poetry? Oh God yes it is! Smith tells us—and rightly so (in “By The Way”):

How can we as performing poets change
For the better with all this talking?
Easy
It’s time to remember the youth and stop
Beating the listener’s ears up with half-assed
Attempts to define your ego in public
The word is not to be fucked with
The power of language suffers when writers
Come unequipped to be fighters…

After the first two poems in this book, I was hooked. Monte Smith joins the strong voices of Amiri Baraka, Terrence Hayes, Tom Terrell, James Baldwin, Langston Hughes and others whom I know are proud to have him in their midst. I have cried, cursed, and put down this book several times only to pick it up again and continue reading and (God help me!) THINKING.

This is not a book to digest with a cup of tea and warm fire in the fireplace. When you read these poems, be ready for the fire to be burning in your belly and singeing your eyelashes. These are poems of strength and a relentless curiosity as to the “why” of hate and racism, violence and terror. Read “102.Gendercide FM” to feel what a real condemnation of the suppression and violence against women is. Smith asks:

How can we stop it?

Like man do the earth
Man do the girl
I ask you…

And later,

How are we going to
Save our daughters?

Monte Smith broke my heart, put it back together, bent my mind, straightened it out a little with a hot iron, and, in the end, made me wish I’d written these poems. Look and listen for more from this young voice. He tells us:

I duct-taped a brick to my pen before I wrote I this
Matter of fact I do it nightly
For the high and mighty
Lyrically lost in their own wonderland…

Indeed he did exactly that. That brick sits on my desk, a reminder of what strength in words really means. Buy this book. Buy one for yourself and buy a few to hand out to a literary community and a planet often blinded by a witless desire to stay blind and deaf.
Thank you, Monte Smit"CHILL RUN" Author Russell Brooks 

 

 You know a publicity stunt has backfired when someone dies.


Starving author Eddie Barrow, Jr., will do anything to get a book deal with a NYC publisher. Even if it means getting  caught by the media while engaging in S&M with a female celebrity as a publicity stunt. What Eddie gets instead are details of a billion dollar fraud scheme from a suicidal client who's fatally shot minutes later. Now on the run from the law and the killers, Eddie seeks help from two unlikely friends—an alcoholic and a dominatrix. With few resources, Eddie races to clear his name, unveil the fraud scheme, and expose the killers before he becomes their next victim.

 I've read "ChillRun" its an action packed page turner..... Characters ,story-line, a book chock full thrill .I highly recommend! To learn more about the author and to purchase go here :http://www.russellparkway.com/store/chillrun.html

 

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 "Gone Sane" is a superb book of poetry . Poem are categorized into chapters from The Historical " Lady Diana"  to Literary "Response to "Lucille Clifton" onto The Lamb "Massacre of the Sacred Circle" truly an eclectic fantastic collection .I read and write a lot of poetry this book stands out !To find out more about the author and to purchase go here :

 http://www.paperbackswap.com/Gone-Sane-Christal-Rice-Cooper/book/096507644X/

 

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 Georgia Banks-Martin walks us through an art gallery. We view art, which she has processed and questioned, through her lens: Lawrence, Monet, Van Gogh, Beardon, Sargent, Degas, to name a few of the artists. She challenges the reader to face slavery, grief, and joy, to feel the weight the South bears, to examine art across centuries for lessons. These poems revive what has been omitted in our history books-individual life stories. She uses sound, music and voice to make imagery pulse in these ekphrastic poems. In her poem "Railroad Station," after a Jacob Lawrence: "Those leaving the towns where father and mother/labored in fields without being offered a yard of thread spun/from the cotton they pulled, have assembled./Packed: Hopes of work, three bedroom homes/water heated in water tanks, classrooms." As memories populate her poems, so does the theme of hope permeate her book; in Death Dancing, after a Max Slevogt: "I wish memories could be buried as easily as bodies." . . . a book to remember as you stand face to face with art. 

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Copies can be purchased from:

http://plainviewpress.net/gallery2/pages/Rhapsody-For-Lessons-Learned-Or-Remembered.html